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Contact Information
James F. Ford, Ph.D.
Chairperson

Annunciation Center 315

Phone: (973) 290-4324
jford@steu.edu

Success Stories

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Michelle Perez

B.A. in Criminal Justice

Minor in Victim Services

As a criminal justice major and a victim services minor, Michelle Perez has been gaining invaluable experience interning with the Morris Township Police Department.

As an intern, Michelle was assigned to an officer and participated in ride-alongs during their shifts. During this time, she was able to witness how officers respond to calls for service and gain experience in more proactive police work, such as motor vehicle stops and community policing.

The hours she spent with the Department underscored the importance of community engagement within policing. She recognized that, with the community's support, it's significantly easier for officers to perform their jobs.

Read Michelle's Story


Gissel Escalante

B.A. in Criminal Justice/B.S. in Business Administration

Gissel Escalante never had a single place to call home. She was born in Ecuador and spent several years in Spain before immigrating to the United States. Once in the country, her family moved from state to state and town to town on multiple occasions.

Frequently moving may have expanded Gissel's worldview but her strong sense of morality originates from her mother. Having earned her bachelor's in commerce and business administration while in Ecuador, Gissel's mother wanted to earn her master's degree to improve her employment opportunities. However, she momentarily sacrificed this dream to provide her daughters with a better life.

To honor her family's sacrifice, Gissel has always pushed herself. She expected to earn straight As in all of her classes and, any time she felt like quitting, Gissel would think of her mother's struggle and work even harder. As a double major in criminal justice and business administration, Gissel brought her motivation to succeed to SEU.

After graduating, Gissel hopes to become a fraud investigator who helps people who have had their lives ruined by this crime.

Read Gissel's Story


Jacqueline Carter

Master's in Justice Administration and Public Service

"I entered law enforcement to foster change within the community and to be a positive role model," says Jacqueline Carter, director of the Community Engagement Division for a Sheriff's Office in TX. She is the first African American woman to hold this position in the agency.

⁠ Throughout her nearly 30-year career, one of Jacqueline's main goals has been to improve the relationship between law enforcement and the community. She does this through extensive community programming and by being an exemplary role model as a law enforcement professional herself.

As a member of the National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives (NOBLE) and the International Council of Women in Law Enforcement, Jacqueline was asked to speak at SEU's Police Studies Institute on campus. This event ultimately led to Jacqueline enrolling in SEU's master's in justice administration and public service program.

Read Jacqueline's Story


Devin Hinchcliffe

B.A. in Criminal Justice and M.A. in Justice Administration and Public Service

As a police officer and EMT, Devin Hinchcliffe's life has changed drastically during the COVID-19 pandemic. Since domestic violence incidents, medical calls, and traffic accidents don't lend themselves to social distancing guidelines, Devin had to rely heavily on the use of personal protective equipment.

Outfitted in protective suits, gloves, googles, and respirators to avoid infection, Devin went to work. During the peak of the novel coronavirus, Devin saw a major influx of very sick patients who required immediate treatment and transportation. However, as a fourth-generation law enforcement officer with a deep conviction for helping others, Devin's concern was always for his patients and fellow first responders, never himself.

"One of the hardest things about working in these fields during this pandemic has been watching fellow police officers, firefighters and EMTs become sick and even die from COVID-19 as a result of performing their duties," says Devin, who earned a bachelor's in criminal justice at SEU.

Read Devin's Story


Debra Pacheco

B.A. in Criminal Justice/B.A in Psychology

Debra Pacheco, '21, originally wanted to study psychology to better understand her brother who struggles with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). As she continued her education, Debra earned an opportunity to intern at SEARCH Learning Group.

An acronym for Science-based Education targeting Autism Resulting in Change and Hope, SEARCH offers highly specialized behavior analytic services to address the needs of those living with autism. In this role, Debra observes and assists the instructors with running programs for the children.

"Not only am I learning more about others in this internship but I'm learning more about myself," explains Debra, a double major in psychology and criminal justice. Most importantly, this experience made Debra realize that she's passionate about working with children who have either physical or mental disabilities.

Read Debra's Story


Lieutenant Heather Glogolich

Criminal Justice Professor

On October 16, 2008, Heather Glogolich's then husband returned from his shift as a police officer extremely intoxicated. Visibly disgruntled, her ex-husband began to take his frustration out on his wife. While this was a routine occurrence, the verbal abuse slowly escalated into severe physical violence leading him to almost shoot and kill his wife.

"As a police officer, I had more resources than most people do in abusive situations," says Heather who is a lieutenant for the Morris County Police Department and professor in SEU's criminal justice program. "I have training, but I kept thinking, 'What about people who don't know what to do?'"

Heather's personal experience with abuse led her to become the law enforcement liaison for VictimsVoice, an app that allows users to collect evidence necessary to build legal cases against their abusers. The app, which enables victims to record information about abuse, stores every single keystroke on a secure server. Since nothing can be edited or altered, VictimsVoice is legally admissible in court.

"Victims are constantly re-victimized by the court systems," explains Heather. "Using this app could have proven my story; it would not have been my word against his."


David Clowney

Master's in Justice Administration and Public Service

David Clowney, '11, a retired wide receiver in the National Football League (NFL), used to leave practice with the New York Jets in Florham Park and drive down the road to Saint Elizabeth University. Clowney's profound respect for education enabled him to pursue a master's in justice administration and public service at SEU while balancing fatherhood with the rigorous demands of being a professional athlete.

"When my son was first born, he never slept. So, I'd stay up late each night to get all my work done," recalls Clowney, who is currently the inside receiver coach and pass game coordinator at Howard University in Washington, DC. "I would literally watch game film, pause it, read a chapter of homework while rocking my son's crib and then go back to the film."

Read David's Story


Danielle Crosson

B.A. in Criminal Justice

Human trafficking, corruption and fraud- these topics are typically reserved for the subject of evocative headlines. However, Danielle Crosson, '20, spent eight weeks fighting these crimes with the Newark division of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). As part of the FBI's prestigious Honors Internship Program, Danielle was able to work on real, time-sensitive cases.

"In most internships, students spend a lot of time shadowing someone else without too much hands-on experience," explains Danielle, a double major in both criminal justice and psychology. "However, just a day after orientation I was analyzing bank records, watching surveillance videos and conducting data analysis."

For Danielle, this internship was a dream come true. She'd been intent on joining the law enforcement field ever since she was a child and nothing was going to get in her way. Even when doctors informed Danielle that she needed serious reconstructive knee surgery just one week before the program began, her commitment never wavered. She underwent the intensive surgery and showed up to the FBI headquarters on crutches, ready to work.

Read Danielle's Story


Syrus Scott

B.A. in Criminal Justice

Syrus Scott, '23, has dedicated his life to being a positive role model for his two nephews. Constantly attempting to better himself, Syrus wants the boys to emulate his volunteerism, levelheadedness and commitment to education. He hopes they will follow in his footsteps and break barriers in their own communities.

As for Syrus, he prides himself on his ability to start conversations about racial stigma and ignorance. "There's this idea that black men hate cops," explains Syrus who intends on entering the law enforcement field upon graduating from SEU. "But I want to prove that that's not true. A lot of the problems in this world can be solved with a conversation. It's the first step in making anything better."

Read Michelle's Story


Gary Markowitz

Certification in Cyber Security and Investigation

Gary Markowitz, a retired police officer, was the first person to complete SEU's 12-credit certification in cyber security investigation.

"I ran a community policing unit for nine years and I can absolutely say that getting this certificate at SEU enables police officers to better themselves, their community and the residents they served."

However, this degree isn't just reserved for law enforcement officers. "The certification in cyber security investigation applies to both the public and private sector," explains Dr. Jim Ford, director of justice administration and public service. "You don't have to be in law enforcement to pursue this certificate."

In addition to the certification in cyber security investigation, Saint Elizabeth's also offers certificates in counter terrorism and leadership in community policing.

Read Gary's Story


Zipporah Thomas

Master's in Justice Administration and Public Service

When she's not disrupting the sale of illegal narcotics or arresting criminals, Detective Sergeant Zipporah Thomas is raising her children and earning her master's at SEU. However, crime rarely respects conventional business hours and unpredictable, demanding shifts makes it difficult for active law enforcement officers to enroll in traditional graduate programs.

Luckily, SEU's understands these challenges. "The criminal justice program at Saint Elizabeth's is designed for people in law enforcement by people who've been in law enforcement," explains Zipporah. "They understand the need for flexibility with our jobs and families because they've been there themselves."

Read Zipporah's Story